Earth’ling

Readings returned slightly less than optimal levels, but their shuttle-mind assured them of safety.

The first creature stumbled out, overwhelmed by colours. The browns and blues and golden yellows were not where they should be.

And it hadn’t ever seen so much green.

Their journey from the dying world began generations ago, long before their own time.

What was left of them.

This world was here, now. All around. Spreading, reaching further into the distance than the ship-born ever thought possible.

The creature crouched, removing protection from an appendage, and touched the Earth.

All at once, it felt home.

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


April 22, 2021, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about earthing. Put a character’s hands, feet or body and soul into the earth. Who needs recharging? What happens between the interaction? Go where the prompt leads!

Submissions now closed. Read the full collection here.

If you enjoyed this piece, please consider supporting the author via ko-fi.

Warm Welcome

“Pathway closed. Rift secure,” announced a warm voice, filling the air around two bewildered humans. Adult and child; woman and girl.

A different being approached. Human, only in appearance.

“Welcome,” it said, robes fluttering, “we trust your journey was painless?”

“Please help,” the woman held the girl close, “she’s-“

“Yes, we’ll take care of the child,” the being smiled.

Others came to collect her.

“No need for thanks,” the being motioned, “there’s much time.”

A chill ran through the woman before the warm voice gently eased it away.

“She’ll be healed soon,” the voice uttered, lulling her into inaction.

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


April 15, 2021, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story that seeds generosity. Who is generous and why? Think of generosity as planting a future outcome. Go where the prompt leads!

Submissions now closed. Read the full collection here.

If you enjoyed this piece, please consider supporting the author via ko-fi.

Supply Run

Slinking along the dark and barren hillside, pack of acquired supplies secured tight, I see movement.

Have I been caught?

I drop low, confident in my darkened outer-wear, and watch the quiet, sprawling city. A flash by the edge reveals an individual stumbling past the barrier, long, unshaven white hair gleaming in the night.

I need to leave before next watch begins, but they fall.

I weigh the risks, and reluctantly return.

“Can you walk?” I ask.

They nod, startled.

“Put this on,” a shawl for their hair.

With sounds of next watch beginning, we disappear into the hillside.

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


April 8, 2021, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story that “rethinks the hero.” Define the hero, comparing or contrasting to the classic definition. Break the mold. What happens to the hero in the cave? Is it epic or everyday? Is there resistance or acceptance? Go where the prompt leads!

Submissions now closed. Read the full collection here.

If you enjoyed this piece, please consider supporting the author via ko-fi.

Swift Passage

The alien planet hung like a pool of blue. Their only stop on a one-way journey.

Their vessel’s final dregs of energy concealed them in orbit while their shuttle fell into the alien atmosphere.

The violent entry rattled the shuttle, pilot and crew breathed deep lungfuls, fighting to clear their minds, to imagine a paradise so near.

Generations spent drifting through the void had corroded all memories of their world from before.

This or death.

The pilot’s expert hands flew across controls – navigating, maintaining, adjusting – to grant the first of their last a swift passage into their new world.

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


April 1 2021, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about a swift passage. You can take inspiration from any source. Who is going where and why. What makes it swift? Go where the prompt leads!

Submissions now closed. Read the full collection here.

If you enjoyed this piece, please consider supporting the author via ko-fi.

An Escape

The nightmares are haunting, full of strangeness. They call me through them. Who or what, I don’t know, but they’re out there. Waiting.

And I need to go.

She’s nice and all, but she’s not them. There’s something more waiting elsewhere. Maybe it’s where I belong.

I climb out the window in the cold, dark of night, when the sun won’t burn me, and I find the car waiting. I pay with her card and direct the car to the countryside, out west, toward the calls.

There’s something inside my head, something different, something they know.

Maybe that’s home.

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


March 25 2021, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write an escape. It can be daring or subtle. Who is escaping from what and why? Go where the prompt leads!

Submissions now closed. Read the full collection here.

If you enjoyed this piece, please consider supporting the author via ko-fi.

March 2021

Sci-fi TV

This might come as a shock to most, but-

I’ve never seen Firefly.

I’ve listened to endless podcast episodes, read countless blog posts, been part of numerous conversations between creatives, where Firefly has always been touted as the best-of-the-best in sci-fi story structure, world building and compelling characters, but I still had never seen it.

So when a certain streaming provider announced their new collection of shows and movies included Firefly, you can guarantee I stuck it high on my priority list.

A few episodes in now and it lives up to every expectation. Funny, complex, action-packed, and all built around a sci-fi world that hits closer to home than the gigantic space operas with FTL drives and wormholes and the like. The characters are deep and lovable, while being far from perfect (though this is often what makes any character lovable). Captain Mal is a barrel of contradictions, except for his core motivation, the love of his crew. He would do anything for them, no matter his defensive, tough guy attitude (he’s battling a whole lotta crap in his head) and that’s beautiful.

I especially loved the second scene in the first episode where they’re floating around in only slightly less bulky, NASA-esque spacesuits, among the wreckage of an abandoned ship. I could picture our own astronauts, with our current technology, doing just the same. And it felt real.

So that’s been a fascinating and utterly worth-it dive into another faucet of the Sci-fi world, despite my conviction to get the words done, I believe Firefly has been worth every minute.

Reading on the other hand- you can’t write well if you don’t read. So, onto books!

Sci-Fi Novels

Currently I’m reading To Sleep in a Sea of Stars by Christopher Paolini – who was the sole inspiration for me to begin my writing journey way back when, after reading the Eragon/Inheritance Tetra-logy (something around 8-15 times each, depending on the number of the book in the series, #1 Eragon being the most read) – and I am loving it.

It bleeds with the passion and dedication of the ten years he put into the worlds and characters and the plot. Revising and re-writing over and over until it was just right. I thoroughly appreciated the shout-out to one of my favourite characters in Eragon at about 20% in (you’ll have to read it too). That sparked a few tears of joy.

He was my favourite author as a kid, before I knew anything at all about Sci-Fi. The fact that he dove right into Sci-Fi too, with all of his heart, feels like we’re on a similar journey and it’s powerful to find an inspiration like that. I’m determined to flesh out my own worlds with as much realism and dimension as he has given the Sea of Stars universe.

I’m also reading Hunting the Corrigan’s Blood by Holly Lisle (free first chapter sneak peek via the link) whose teachings have empowered so many writers around the world to learn how to wrangle that elusive muse and get it spewing words and worlds in minutes. Her sci-fi is fast paced, with powerful multi-dimensional characters, and galaxy-spanning concepts. I’m loving it. I had to put down The Longview Chronicles to read this one, as the characters intersect and I just had to learn all about the infamous Cadence Drake before going any further.

I do not regret it.

Reading is so good for the soul.

Also reading:

Space Unicorn Blues by T.J.Berry which is another fast-paced, strange, dark fantasy, Sci-fi novel with characters who are full of humour and attitude.
Aestus by S.Z.Atwell a dark, post-apocalyptic sci-fi where the human race now lives in cities beneath the ground. The characters are complex and fascinating so far.

I also have a full bag of library books I just had to take with me when I last visited. No guarantees I’ll read them all before they’re due back but I’m well on the way through Space Unicorn Blues so far, so it’s a good sign. I just need to remember to read while I eat and wait at school pickup rather than perusing social media (though I’m slowly pulling away from all the platforms more and more to focus on the words, and will return when closer to release).


Current Project – Novel

The words are bogged down this month, but I get something small down most days. I wasn’t reaching my daily page goals for the first couple of weeks, but toward the end that number improved.

I’m always advancing, and that’s the key.

Up to 25k so far. If you’ve been following my flash fiction pieces, my WIP has just intersected with The End and Deep Wishes. I’m dabbling further into horror than I thought, but the darkness has always fascinated me.

Don’t worry, there’s a happy ending! And not too much body horror.

Just an air of creepiness.

Also, I tried a new tactic to get those words moving again, which helped me improve toward the end of the month.

Rather than writing from the MC’s POV – as I had been for the whole draft so far – I swapped out to an omniscient POV, and just wrote each scene out, one event after the next, adding in little excerpts of direct dialogue or descriptive passages as they came to me, and it has helped immensely.

I even changed pen colour, to shift that along. Since I prefer Black ink, and I use Blue, Red and Green to add snippets and notes to reference in revision, I swapped to alternating blue and green between scenes, which just makes the writing feel less restricted.

Less like “these words have to be in the final copy,” and more like “here, have some general notes, do with them as you will.” I am loving it.

I highly suggest you play around with different colours and fonts and even stickers, for your first draft. Use them as rewards every time you complete a set of words, or a page, or a scene etc. Make the work fun and it’ll feel less like a slog, allowing you to conjure up more motivation to get back to writing every time you’re pulled away.

What’s a tactic you’ve experimented with and found helpful in getting that first draft done?

Leave your answers and thoughts below. I respond to each and every comment here on my website. Otherwise, pop over to the contact page and send me an email, I love to hear from readers and writers of all kinds.

For now, remember to:

Explore, create, repeat-

Then thrive.

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


If you enjoyed the author’s work, please consider supporting via ko-fi.

Deep Wishes

I feel invisible blows as fear and pain chemicals flood my place within my host’s brain. Her carer is destroying her, setting fire to her mind with every heartache, every forgotten promise, every silence, every lie.

I wish to protect her, to save her.

To survive.

Her carer’s mind was lost in the depths of its own flood long ago.

My host is an Earthen youngling, at her carer’s mercy, but I am neither.

As she sleeps, I break a vital rule and guide her body through the dwelling, to her carer’s room.

Here, I end my host’s nightmare.

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


This piece is a Point-of-View (POV) shift to previously written piece, The End.

March 11, 2021, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about deep wishes. Where is the deep — in the sky, the ground, or outer space? What kind of wishes reside there for whom and why? Go where the prompt leads!

Submissions now closed. Read the full collection here.

If you enjoyed this piece, please consider supporting the author via ko-fi.

Delicacies for the Most High

Roasted rare Earthen tuber, orange like the setting sun, melted sweet and warm on her tongue. She studied her creation on the plains below. Her Youngling workforce departed, dragging their feet, hair blowing heavy in the evening breeze.

She turned and left.

“Here she is!”

A crowd cheered as she emerged, awaiting her grand reveal.

“This-“

Her award, a sculpture in her likeness.

“-for your work in advancements of Younglings. Look what you’ve created through them!”

A wall slid away, revealing her creation; the first city.

Gasps turned to cheers.

She beamed with pride, what would she craft next?

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


March 4, 2021, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story that includes sweet potatoes. It can be part of a recipe, meal, or used as a nickname. Where do sweet potatoes take you? The grocery store? The garden? Mars? Go where the prompt leads!

Submissions now closed. Read the full collection here.

If you enjoyed this piece, please consider supporting the author via ko-fi.

January 2021

Welcome to 2021!

This year is off to a horrendous start after the events of Jan 6th.

Making a Difference

The Writing Community is huge on Twitter and I’ve been using my platform to retweet BIPOC writers where I can.

I copped an astonishing smack in the face when I checked my twitter profile in Dec 2020. I restarted my profile alongside website updates (Oct 2020), and have been building a following since. One day in December, I noticed that only 1-3% of the 4.5k individuals (between my followers and those I’m following) were BIPOC.

That’s Twitter algorithms for you…

If you want to play your part and help improve the exposure other BIPOC writers get within your own white following, check out the following points.

These Hashtags are in frequent use:

#BlackAuthors #BlackWriters
#BIPOCWriter #BIPOCAuthor
#DiverseWriter #DiverseAuthor
#BlackMenWrite #BlackWomenWrite
#AfricanAmericanFiction #BIPOCFiction

Here are some profiles to follow:

The BIPOC Bookshelf
Black Writers Collective
Fiyah Literary Magazine
Hurston/Wright Foundation for Black Writers
Amistad Books
Black Girls Create
Open Country Mag
20.35 Africa

And Retweet Retweet Retweet BIPOC Authors and Writers where you can.

While there’s so much more I’ve missed across the huge platform, I’ve only been actively at this for a month now.

If you’re keen for something to read, check out this! I’m reading Escaping Exodus by Nicky Drayden and the world building is something else.

Share your own hashtags, profiles and tips in the comments section below to help support the BIPOC community.


Current Project Update

Developed most of my third alien culture and – after a quick brainstorming session with my better half – I’ve found it easier to get the details on paper.

Reason: this culture is flawed and damaged and full of conflict and agony and desperate hopes for survival.

The first culture was none of those things.

Yet.

Beyond that, I’ve paused world-building (having developed everything I NEED) and am…

writing the first draft!

hand-writing it

Putting pen to paper has always felt natural for me, so, naturally, I should be “shovelling that first draft sand into the story sandbox” via the same means.

I’ve been world-building with pen and paper. Pages and pages of handwritten notes. So when time came to approach the first draft, I felt a knot in my gut where my enthusiasm should be.

I didn’t want to go digital. Hand-writing had become such a part of my daily routine. My self care. The idea of putting words on a screen didn’t feel right.

At least, not yet.

Ideas flow so much easily through ink, for me. And I know there are others who feel the same.

So why hadn’t I ever considered this before?

Alas, no regrets! This is a journey.

We are all learning each time we put words down.

Never stop learning.


Craft Tips

Fictional Languages

Consider this: when creating a fictional language, how do you want your characters to sound? Aggressive? Passive? Thoughtful? Eager?

Letters like T and P create a harsh, hard sound, while M and S add softer tones, slowing down the dialogue.

Throw in some other sounds like hums, clicks or growls and you’ll be on your way to crafting the feel you’re looking for, adding hidden depth and complexity to your cultures.

Check out Holly’s Writing Classes for both her Create a Language and Create a Culture Clinics to advance your skills even further.


Endings

Endings.

The End.

They all lived happily ever after.

They come along with a bang, or sneak up and hit you in the heart.

When written well, all the story pieces tie off neatly, with a huge helping of reader satisfaction.

So they should be easy right? While writing, we should just know how it will end.

Every time.

Wrong.

There’s no right way to create your endings.

Some of us start with the end. Others discover it halfway through (at that dreaded mid-point). And yet others may finish their first draft with the words, The End, without a resolution to all the different paths a story can take.

A revelation from the wonderful writing community hosted by Podcaster Sarah Rhea Werner:

You can end it later.

We can end it in our rewrites, revisions, second, third, fourth, tenth drafts.

We can add foreshadowing, themes, concepts later.

You can end it later.

Just get that first draft DONE.


Flash Fiction

2021 Goal: I’ll be posting a brand new Flash Fiction piece every week this year.

Go experience the very first pieces for 2021 on my Flash Fiction page.

Check out the Carrot Ranch for the weekly challenges I’ll be participating in.

Only 99 words required!

Free to enter, open to all.


Write on!

Best wishes to all writers this year in kicking your own goals and moving forward with intent, determination and joy.

You deserve success!

Remember to: explore, create, repeat.

Then thrive.

© 2021 Rebecca Glaessner


If you enjoyed the author’s work, please consider supporting via ko-fi.

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